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Sage Notes, Winter 2000, Vol 22(1) Newsletter of the Idaho Native Plant Society

In this issue...
New INPS President Karl Holte: Now, How about a Vice President?
Louis F. Henderson (1853-1942), Early Northwest Botanist - Rhoda M. Love
Carex aboriginum (Indian Valley Sedge) Rediscovered - Curtis Bjork
INPS Website - Valerie Geertson
A Summary of the Results from the 16th Idaho Rare Plant Conference - Michael Mancuso
Conservation of Spalding's Catchfly (Silene spandingii) at Garden Creek Ranch (Hell's Canyon, ID) - Janice Hill and Karen Gray
Idaho Native Plant Society Board Meeting - Leonard Lake
INPS Membership
Chapter News
News and Notes


Authors of Sage Notes articles have given their permission for reproducing their work on-line. To use their material for educational and personal use, please cite the original author or illustrator and the issue of Sage Notes. Commercial use is not permitted without permission from Sage Notes Editor, Idaho Native Plant Society, PO Box 9451, Boise, ID 83707.

Articles in Sage Notes reflect the views of the authors and are not an official position of the Idaho Native Plant Society.


 

 

New INPS President Karl Holte: Now, How About a Vice President?

Karl Holte, Sah-Wah-Be Chapter member, has stepped forward to serve as INPS president. He was appointed by the Board of Directors to finish the term of president that is currently vacant (see p. 10).

Karl recently retired from Idaho State University, where he taught plant taxonomy and was curator of the Ray J. Davis Herbarium. He continues to teach spring/summer/fall flora. Karl’s courses at ISU have encouraged many amateur and professional botanists. He is renowned for his approachability and interest in students. He has served as president of the Idaho Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, Idaho Wildlife Federation, Citizens Environmental Council, Southeastern Idaho Rod and Gun Club, and the Idaho Orchid Society. He has taught field botany and natural history during the summers at Malheur Field Station in southeastern Oregon. Karl hopes someone will step forward to serve as vice president. The primary role of this officer is to organize the INPS annual state trip (two suggestions so far: Steens Mountain, or Leslie Gulch). Please contact him with your suggestions: <holtkarl@isu.edu> or (208) 236-3530, 236-3882, or at his home 232-6563. Welcome, Karl !

 

 

Louis F. Henderson (1853-1942), Early Northwest Botanist

Rhoda M. Love, Oregon Native Plant Society

Ed. note: Although Louis Henderson and John Leiberg (Sage Notes 21(4) Fall, 1999) were contemporaries, and both collected in Idaho for Frederick Coville of the U.S. National Herbarium, they never met. They corresponded and exchanged specimens, and fortunately, duplicates of many of Henderson’s specimens that burned in Moscow in 1906 were preserved in Leiberg’s personal collection, which he gave to the University of Oregon before he died in 1913. Henderson organized and incorporated the Leiberg material into the UO collections when he became UO herbarium curator eleven years after Leiberg’s untimely death.

Louis Henderson was one of the most important and active of our early resident northwest botanists. He collected plants in virtually every corner of the three northwestern states during 65 years in the field. He was the first American botanist to explore the Olympic Mountains of Washington, and the first to survey Idaho’s Salmon River country. His tens of thousands of meticulously annotated specimens provide a detailed record of our changing plant communities. Henderson’s life story is a fascinating one which demands a full-scale biography.

Louis Forniquet Henderson, grandson of a U.S. Senator, was born near Boston in 1853. His father was a New Orleans lawyer, and the Civil War caught the Henderson family in the south in 1861. Due to the unexpected start of hostilities, young Louis and his mother and older brother were forced to sustain themselves on an unproductive farm in Mississippi throughout the war. They survived and were reunited with his father only to be faced with a family tragedy. The father, an abolitionist, was brutally murdered by angry whites during a New Orleans race riot in 1866. Moving north, Henderson attended Cornell University, studying languages and botany. After graduation he moved west, first to California and then to Oregon. Henderson’s mother also settled in Oregon, buying land near Hood River, where Henderson began his botanizing. From 1877 to 1889, he was a teacher at Portland High School. During this time he explored Washington and Oregon and began to build a large personal herbarium.

In 1883, after what his daughter called a "whirlwind love affair," Henderson and fellow-teacher Kate Robinson were married in Portland. Their two daughters, Margaret and Connie, were born in 1886 and 1888. In 1889 a bout of typhoid fever forced the botanist to resign his school position and move to Olympia, Washington to recuperate near the home of his brother. By 1890, he had recovered to the point where he was able to join the O’Neil expedition to explore the interior of the Olympic Peninsula. In 1892 he accepted a position with the state of Washington to collect plants for the famous Chicago Columbian Exposition, and he and his family moved temporarily to Chicago to set up the state exhibit.

Leaving Chicago in 1893 at the age of 40, Henderson accepted a post as the first botany professor at the 3-year-old University of Idaho in Moscow. His title was Professor of Botany and Head of the Herbarium. Henderson’s teaching duties were onerous. There were only seven professors on the faculty, and during his early years the botanist taught eight classes a day. He was assigned such subjects as systematic botany, plant physiology, histology, cryptogamic botany, forestry, and economic botany. Despite this heavy load, Henderson made as much time as possible for collecting. In addition to teaching, collecting, and curating the herbarium, he was expected to study scientific and agricultural subjects, hold farmers’ institutes, and write bulletins on farm subjects. One of these that I believe would be of interest to land managers today is his 45-page illustrated paper, "Twelve of Idaho’s Worst Weeds," in Bulletin 14, 1898.

In 1895 Henderson took what he later described as "the longest botanical trip I have ever taken in my life." That summer, with funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, he undertook a botanical reconnaissance of central Idaho, an area then virtually unknown to science. As his assistant he chose student Charles Kirtley, a senior at the university. The trip was commissioned by Frederick V. Coville, Curator of the U. S. National Herbarium. A complete set of plants collected by Henderson on this extensive trip are filed at the National Herbarium, an important consideration, as many of Henderson’s Idaho collections were later lost.

Henderson has described the 1895 trip with Kirtley at length in his 1932 autobiographical account, "Early Experiences of a Botanist in the Northwest," which was serialized in the Bulletin of the Native Plant Society of Oregon in 1981 and 1982. The two collected extensively from June 1 to the end of September, traveling with pack animals and a single saddle horse. They covered over a thousand miles, their itinerary including Salmon River, Lost River Mountains, Boise River, Soldier Mountains, Wood River, Ketchum, and other areas. The two men had encounters with rattlesnakes, range wars, threats of Indian uprisings, torrential rains, landslides, swollen rivers, a stage coach buried in mud, and the ubiquitous mosquitoes. They saw desolation due to mining, as well as rich, unspoiled country. On Birch Creek they helped move a ranch family into the hills to avoid Indians. Henderson’s later comment was: "I botanized, Indians or no Indians."

While at Idaho, Henderson published four articles introducing new plant species to science. He named a new Indian paintbrush he found on the 1895 trip for Coville, calling it Castilleja covilleana, and writing, "I take pleasure in dedicating this unique species to Mr. Coville, botanist of the Agriculture Department at Washington, through whose instrumentality I was enabled to take the trip." He also named a nemophila for his student assistant, calling it Nemophila kirtleyi, and writing, "I take pleasure in dedicating this species to my young friend and companion of my 1895 trip, Charles Kirtley of Salmon Idaho."

His paper"New Plants from Idaho and from other Localities of the Northwest," was published in the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club in 1900. When he wrote this paper, Henderson and Kate were spending a sabbatical leave at Harvard University, which he later described as "the most enjoyable year I ever spent in my life." C. V. Piper of Washington State College was also on sabbatical at Harvard that year, and the Hendersons and the Pipers made a happy foursome enjoying concerts and museum tours.

Five years after this delightful interlude, disaster struck. On March 30, 1906, the University of Idaho Administration Building burned to the ground, destroying the herbarium. It has been estimated that as many as 85,000 specimens were consumed, including Henderson’s personal collection of over 10,000 sheets, the result of nearly 30 years of collecting. Letters indicate that, heartbreakingly, at the precise time of the fire he was negotiating to sell his private herbarium to the Chicago Field Museum for $1,000. In a letter to the museum he wrote:

To make this collection I have spent all my odd hours since leaving Cornell in ‘74 . . . . I have scoured the remote places of Idaho, Oregon and Washington, from the California line to British Columbia, and from the Ocean to Montana. I do not believe you could find a collection in this North West which contains so many rare and new plants.

Henderson later stated that with the collection went "notebooks, books, instruments, letters from prominent botanists all over the world and all my private papers." The destruction of both the collection and the field notebooks was a serious loss to northwest science; fortunately, however, due to Henderson’s scrupulous exchanging of specimens, duplicates of many of the burned sheets exist in other herbaria. The loss was surely a crushing personal blow. His daughter Margaret recalled, "For a while it took the heart out of him and he would do no more collecting." At 52 years old Henderson said he lost "one of the joys of my life."

Disheartened, Henderson retired from teaching in 1908. Three years later, when his daughters had finished college, he moved to the 80-acre family homestead in Hood River, Oregon, bequeathed to him by his mother. There he planted a 40-acre apple orchard and attempted (never very successfully) to make a living as a commercial orchardist. Henderson remained on this ranch for 13 years; however, it is clear that he missed the botanical life. Fortunately, in 1924, at the age of 71, he was lured out of retirement by Albert Sweetser, head of the Department of Botany at the University of Oregon, who offered him the curatorship of the herbarium in Eugene. Though a septuagenarian, Henderson was far from a frail man. Just nine days before his seventieth birthday, he swam across the undammed Columbia River from Hood River to the Washington side.

At the University of Oregon, Henderson once again threw himself into vigorous botanical activity, collecting, mounting, labeling and building up the herbarium, a regimen that would have taxed a person half his age. During his 15 years at Oregon he worked systematically throughout the state, covering such areas as the remote John Day country, the rugged southwest coast, the Alvord Desert and Steens Mountain, and isolated Hart Mountain. In 1932, he fulfilled a lifelong wish to botanize in Alaska and the Yukon. A fellow botanist wrote of him, "He seems to have found the fountain of eternal youth in his love for plants."

Henderson retired from the University of Oregon in 1939 at the age of 86 and moved to Tacoma, Washington to live near his married daughter Margaret. She reported that even in his mid-80s he was physically active, hiking in the foothills of the Cascades and swimming and diving with his grandchildren. He died in Tacoma on June 14, 1942, at the age of 88 years. His daughter wrote that his last year was peaceful and he simply "went to sleep at last."

At the time of his retirement, Louis Henderson probably knew the flora of the Northwest better than any living botanist. He left tens of thousands of sheets in herbaria throughout the country. He introduced countless new species to science. He published the names and descriptions of 64 taxa. Approximately 30 species were named for him, and 15 species and one variety bear his name today. One of these is Idaho’s Ribes hendersonii, collected by the botanist in the Lost River Mountains on August 14, 1895 on the memorable trip with Kirtley. The species was named by C. L. Hitchcock in 1961, 66 years after its discovery and nearly 20 years after the collector’s death.

[Author’s note: this essay was taken from a book in preparation on northwest plant collectors edited by Arthur R. Kruckeberg and Rhoda Love. A longer sketch of Henderson’s life will appear in Pacific Northwest Quarterly, Fall 2000 (Pacific Northwest Quarterly, University of Washington, PO Box 353587, Seattle, WA 98195-3587). I thank many individuals as well as the staffs of the University of Oregon Library and the University of Idaho Library for their assistance. R. L.]

 

 

 

 

Carex aboriginum (Indian-Valley sedge) Rediscovered

Curtis Bjork, Washington State University

While prospecting for interesting plant specimens for the University of Idaho herbarium, I took a random side road off Highway 95 and saw a small meadow of vibrant green sedges following the course of an intermittent stream. The contrast of robust sedges in the surrounding gold and gray of the parched Weiser valley rangeland was visually outstanding, and I had to get out of the car for a closer look. Despite the desiccated soil, even in the streambed, there were sedges (Carex sheldonii and Carex aboriginum) and a spikerush (Eleocharis bolanderi) that showed no sign of drought stress.

 

Carex aboriginum is a dark green, leafy sedge that grows to about two and a half feet tall. The fruiting spikes ascend above the leaves, and the spikes are multicolored and very attractive. The perigynia are large, up to about 5.5 mm, and weakly inflated. Within each perigynium I opened, I found well-formed achenes, which are trigonous and sharp-angled.

Indian-Valley sedge was first collected in the Weiser valley by Marcus Jones on July 12, 1899, at Indian Valley near Salubria, and hasn’t been collected since. That collection was the only occurrence recorded at the Conservation Data Center, who had considered it to be globally extinct.

The rediscovered population is now the only one known, making it a very vulnerable species, indeed. At the time I found the plants, cattle were grazing the meadow. C. aboriginum seems to escape grazing, perhaps as poor forage. In all areas of the meadow where the sedge does not grow, cattle have obviously degraded the community through grazing and trampling. Non-native plants constitute much of the cover in the meadow, providing a further threat to the sedge. It is likely that without the cattle and invasive weeds, C. aboriginum would have more of the meadow to occupy. Beyond the protective canopy of the sedge, C. aboriginum seedlings may find it quite a struggle to survive. Most of the Weiser River Valley consists of lowlands converted to agriculture and uplands dominated by native shrubs and introduced annual grasses. There is very little other likely habitat for C. aboriginum in the area. It is my sincere hope that everything possible will be done to preserve this unique and spectacular sedge and the habitat it occupies.

 

As a result of this discovery, the status of Carex aboriginum has been changed from the "believed to be globally extinct" category to Global Priority 1 (see p. 7).

 

 

 

Announcing the Idaho Native Plant Society Web Site! idahonativeplants.org

Valerie Geertson, Pahove Chapter

Currently, this web site is under construction, but you can view some important information. There is information about how to become a member and where to send your dues, how to sign up on the list server, the Rare Plant Conference, and results of past rare plant conferences. The results of the 2000 Conference will be posted as soon as they are finalized.

There are big plans for the web site. Big Plans! Future issues of Sage Notes will be posted, allowing for easy reference and dispersal of the educational and entertaining information contained therein. Links to other web sites will be posted, including other native plant societies, government agencies, native plant gardening sites, and Idaho conservation groups to name just a few. The most ambitious idea is to feature photos and distribution information for each species on the rare plant list (the results of the conferences). Note, however, that it will not be possible to get specific locations of rare plants, only general information about their ranges and habitats.

If you have a link that you would like to have added, please send the URL (the web address) to Valerie Geertson at <valerie@InternetOutlet.net>; the links will be reviewed for accuracy and forwarded to our webmaster, Dan Ray. Any other suggestions are welcomed, be they minor corrections or grandiose ideas. This web site is meant to further the mission of the Society: to promote interest in native plants and plant communities, and to educate members and the public about the values of our native flora.

 

 

 

A Summary of the Results from the 16th Idaho Rare Plant Conference

Michael Mancuso, Conservation Data Center, Boise, ID

The annual Idaho Rare Plant Conference is an opportunity for botanists, agency resource managers, and other interested native plant enthusiasts to review and update the INPS Rare Plant List, and provide the leadership and direction needed to keep rare plant conservation in Idaho moving forward. The Idaho list is divided into three main groups. First are the Globally Rare categories comprised of species considered rare throughout their range. Second are the State Rare categories containing species rare in Idaho, but more common elsewhere. Then there is the Review category, reserved for species that need more information before we know whether or not they are legitimate conservation concerns in Idaho.

The list contains 270 vascular and 35 non-vascular plant species, including 111 in the Globally Rare and 194 in the State Rare categories. The Review category contains another 67 species. Discussions at the conference resulted in a status change for 15 species, a change to the Threat Priority rank for three species, nine species being dropped from the list, and three new species being added to the Review category. These changes once again demonstrate the dynamic nature of the Idaho list as new information becomes available. Results from the conference are outlined below.

 

Andreae heinemanii—This is a small, dark moss that is apparently not common anywhere in its range, which is largely to the north of Idaho. The recently found population south of Grangeville, Idaho, may represent the first collection for the state. It was added to the Review category because more information is needed to assess its status in the state.

 

Astragalus newberryi var. castoreus (Newberry’s milkvetch) —Additional populations of this low-growing, but showy-flowered milkvetch were found in southwestern Owyhee County in 1999. For this reason, it was moved from the State Priority 1 to the State Sensitive category.

 

Botrychium campestre (prairie moonwort)—The first known population of this small, fern-like plant was recently discovered in the White Cloud Mountains of central Idaho. The change from the Review to the Global Priority 3 category was made now that its identification has been verified.

 

Carex aboriginum (Indian Valley sedge)—This species was thought to be extinct, but in 1999 a population was discovered south of Council, in Adams County. Because of this wonderful discovery, Indian Valley sedge was moved from the INPS’s Taxa Believed to be Globally Extinct category to the Global Priority 1 category.

 

Cetraria sepincola—This small, brownish lichen is presently known from only a few Idaho occurrences; however it has a circumpolar distribution. To better reflect its rangewide standing, it was moved from the Global Priority 3 to the State Priority 1 category.

 

Cirsium brevifolium (Palouse thistle)—This Palouse region endemic was moved from the Review to the Global Priority 3 category. Habitat loss and degradation, along with seed predation from introduced biocontrol insects are the main threats facing this native, white-flowered thistle.

 

Crassula aquatica (pigmy-weed)—This is a diminutive, succulent-leaved member of the stonecrop family that has been recently documented in Idaho. Its conservation status in the state is unknown, so it was added to the Review category.

 

Cymopterus ibapensis (Ibapah wavewing)—This species was moved from the State Sensitive to the Review category because of the unclear relationship between plants identified as this taxon from rocky, high elevation sites in east-central Idaho and those from vernal pool and sagebrush habitats in the southwestern corner of the state. Distribution, abundance, and taxonomic questions raised by this unclear relationship need to be clarified to understand conservation concerns for this species.

 

Cyperus rivularis (shining flatsedge)—Recent riparian habitat studies along the Boise, Payette, and Snake rivers in southwestern Idaho have found this tufted annual to be more common than previously known. As a result, it was moved from the State Priority 1 to the State Monitor category.

 

Downingia insignis—Not known in Idaho until 1998, this pretty annual flower was added to the Review category at last year’s conference. No additional populations were found this past year, and it was moved to the State Priority 1 category (Owyhee County).

 

Iris versicolor—Despite extensive fieldwork in northern Idaho wetland habitats over the years, this small iris remains only rarely reported in the state. As a result, it was moved from the Review to the State Sensitive category.

 

Leptodactylon pungens ssp. hazeliae (Hazel’s prickly phlox)—In light of the number of known populations for this Hells Canyon area endemic, and the minimal threats it faces, it was moved from the Global Priority 1 to the Global Priority 2 category.

 

Lesquerella multiceps (western bladderpod)—This regional endemic is known from the Bear River Range in northeastern Utah, extreme southeastern Idaho, and adjacent Wyoming. Because there have been only a handful of collections in Idaho, it was moved from the Review to the Global Priority 3 category.

 

Lomatium packardiae (Packard’s desert-parsley)—This species is known from only about 10 populations in northern Nevada, the Succor Creek area of western Owyhee County, Idaho, and adjacent Malheur County, Oregon. In recognition of this rangewide rarity, it was moved from the Global Priority 3 to the Global Priority 2 category.

 

Lupinus uncialis (inch-high lupine)—In Idaho, this smallest of lupines is known from southern Owyhee County. A few new populations were discovered this past year and its status changed from State Priority 2 to State Sensitive.

 

Orobanche pinorum (pine broomrape)—Known from scattered locations in northern Idaho woodlands. It was added to the Review category.

 

Thalictrum dasycarpum (purple meadow-rue)—Although this is a large and distinctive meadow-rue, it has been collected only a few times in Idaho. It is a widespread species, known in Idaho from the northern and southeastern parts of the state. It was moved from the Review to the State Priority 1 category.

 

Trifolium douglasii (Douglas’ clover)—Most of the known Idaho collections for Douglas’ clover were made prior to 1960. The loss and degradation of prairie, montane meadow, creekside, and open forest habitats has occurred throughout its range in western Idaho and adjacent parts of eastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. This was sufficient information to have it moved from the Review to the Global Priority 3 category.

Except for the few species listed as endangered or threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act, all rare plants in the three Global Priority categories receive a Threat Priority rank as part of their overall INPS rank. This one - twelve ranking system is based mostly on the magnitude and immediacy of threats, with one representing the highest threat rank, and 12 the lowest. The Threat Priority rank was increased from 5 to 2 for Haplopappus liatriformis (Palouse goldenweed); decreased from 9 to 12 for Chrysothamnus parryi ssp. montanus (Centennial rabbitbrush); and decreased from 6 to 12 for Eriogonum ochrocephalum var. calcareum (calcareous buckwheat).

Eight of the nine species taken off the rare plant list were dropped because they were found to be too common, including, Astragalus salmonis (Trout Creek milkvetch), Buxbaumia piperi (Piper’s bug-on-a-stick), Chrysothamnus humilis (dwarf rabbitbrush), Platanthera orbiculata (round-leaved rein-orchid), Rhinanthus minor (yellow rattle-box), Scirpus fluviatilis (river bulrush), Symphoricarpos oreophilus var. parishii (Parish’s snowberry), and Utriculata intermedia (mountain bladderwort). Equisetum scirpoides (sedgelike horsetail) was dropped because it is not known to occur in Idaho.

The names of two species on the list were updated to agree with the current taxonomic thinking in the available volumes of the "Flora of North America." What was formerly called Asplenium viride (green spleenwort) is now Asplenium trichomanes-ramosum, and the Argemone munita (armed prickly poppy) we have in Idaho now goes by the name Argemone munita ssp. rotundata. In addition, Idaho apparently has three varieties of Pediocactus simpsonii (Simpson’s hedgehog cactus), not just the variety robustior as previously thought. As a result, this beautiful cactus will be referred to as simply Pediocactus simpsonii on the Rare Plant List.

 

 

Conservation of Spalding’s Catchfly (Silene spaldingii) at Garden Creek Ranch (Hells Canyon, ID)

Janice Hill and Karen Gray, The Nature Conservancy of Idaho

The 14,000-acre Garden Creek Ranch, located in Hells Canyon south of Lewiston, is jointly owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy and the Bureau of Land Management to protect the high quality natural resources and overall biodiversity. Marked differences in elevation, aspect, and geology have created diverse habitats that support a wide array of plants, plant communities, and animals, many of which are rare and/or endemic. Some of the best remaining examples of Pacific Northwest Bunchgrass canyon grasslands, thirteen rare plants, and thirteen rare plant communities occur at the ranch. The primary threat to this ecosystem is the invasion of a number of aggressive, non-native plants. Weed control and restoration are very difficult due to the steep, inaccessible terrain. The management plan for the Ranch focuses on weed control with priority given to roadways, weed-free areas, satellite infestations, new invader weed species, and rare plant sites.

The Ranch has the largest known population of the proposed threatened plant, Spalding’s catchfly (Silene spaldingii), in Idaho. Currently, approximately 1,800 individual plants have been located. Conservation activities at six S. spaldingii sites in the Lower Corral Creek Study Area were initiated during the summer of 1999. The work consisted of: 1) mapping of S. spaldingii subpopulations and aggressive weed infestations, 2) establishment of permanent photo points, 3) establishment of a belt transect, 4) initial weed control, and 5) collection of data on individual S. spaldingii plants. The rare Palouse goldenweed (Haplopappus liatriformis) occurred with S. spaldingii at one site.

Maps of the spatial relationship between rare plant subpopulations and weed infestations provided baseline information to assess management activities and helped to determine appropriate weed control methods. i.e., hand pulling or herbicide wicking of infestations within rare plant subpopulations or herbicide spraying of infestations located at a safe distance from rare plants. The belt transect, which passed through a Spalding’s catchfly subpopulation and infestations of yellow star-thistle (Centaurea solstitialis) and St. John’s-wort (Hypericum perforatum), was established to monitor the effect of hand weeding and to obtain demographic information. Data collection on individual S. spaldingii plants included number of stems per plant, height of stems, number and stage of reproductive structures per stem, and herbivory.

Eleven aggressive weed species were present at the six sites. Yellow star-thistle and St. John’s-wort were considered to be the worst of the weed threats. Large yellow star-thistle infestations surrounded many of the sites, and small satellite infestations occurred within many of the sites. Extensive infestations of St. John’s-wort occurred within most of the sites. Other aggressive weeds present included annual bromes, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), sulfur cinquefoil (Potentilla recta), teasel (Dipsacus fullonum ssp. sylvestris), Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), Scotch thistle (Onopardium acanthium), leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), and ventenata (Ventenata dubia). Yellow star-thistle and St. John’s-wort were hand pulled in and around the area of the transect and within one meter of all remaining S. spaldingii plants at one site. A leafy spurge infestation, located at a safe distance from rare plants, was sprayed at another site. Weed control will continue at these sites and be initiated at the remaining sites during the 2000 field season.

Herbivory by native ungulates (deer and elk) and insects on S. spaldingii was substantial. Sixty-two percent of the total 453 stems monitored were grazed (the upper portion of the stem plus any reproductive structures present had been removed). None of these grazed stems produced significant regrowth during the remainder of the season. Thirty percent of S. spaldingii reproductive structures were damaged by insect herbivores. Seeds were often missing in capsules that exhibited insect herbivory. Seven percent of the monitored plants were completely missing by the end of the season. The cause of the disappearances is unknown; however, gopher activity was observed in the vicinity.

Reproductive effort of S. spaldingii was relatively high. Seventy-seven percent of the remaining, ungrazed stems bore reproductive structures, fertile stems produced an average of 8 flowers per stem, and a large number of seeds were produced in each capsule. Only 27% of the monitored S. spaldingii stems actually bore reproductive structures. This low percentage was due mainly to loss of reproductive structures to native ungulate herbivory.

Future conservation activities at these six sites will include annual weed control and monitoring. Other S. spaldingii sites will be included as time and resources permit.

 

Idaho Native Plant Society Board Meeting

Leonard Lake, INPS Secretary

The Board of Directors met on February 9, 2000 at 5:30 PM in Boise at the offices of Idaho Power Company. Attending: Kristin Fletcher, Past President; Leonard Lake, Secretary; Steve Rust, Treasurer; Juanita Lichthardt, White Pine Chapter; Sarah Walker, Newsletter Editor; Chris Murphy, Pahove Chapter; Michael Mancuso, Conservation Committee; Karl Holte, Sah-Wah-Be Chapter; Carol Blackburn, Wood River Chapter; Valerie Geertson, Conference Committee.

Treasurer’s Report: Steve Rust provided a review of the society’s finances. Steve suggested that a portion of the funds in checking could be placed in an interest-bearing account (CD). Currently approximately $3,000.00 is available. Steve described three options: CD, income funds, and growth funds. There was discussion by the board on the various options including mutual funds and money market accounts.

Our funding follows a cycle of winter-generated funds as a result of the rare plant conference, with expenses through most of the year. The biggest expense is Sage Notes at approximately $400.00 per issue. The upfront expenses for the rare plant conference have been covered for this year. The board discussed the known expenses that will come due during the year such as our mailing permit and post office box.

There was also discussion of using the income from the account in the future for a scholarship fund or for conservation projects. These ideas were tabled for further discussion and development.

Leonard moved and Juanita seconded that the treasurer move forward with setting up an interest account for no more than $3,000.00 and no longer than one year, with the understanding that enough money remains in checking to cover our operational expenses for the year. The motion carried.

Website: Valerie provided a summary of the website for the Idaho Native Plant Society. It can be found at <idahonativeplants.org>.

The site contains the results of the Rare Plant Conference, chapters and membership information, links, and a list server. In the near future conservation issues will be highlighted along with articles from Sage Notes. Copyright language and disclaimer for the reprinted articles will be developed by the Editorial Board of Sage Notes.

Yearly fee for the server is $35.00. The first two years have been paid.

Juanita moved and Karl seconded to authorize the payment of the yearly fee to maintain the website for the Idaho Native Plant Society. Motion carried.

Dues increase: There was a proposal to raise our state dues by $5.00 and change the ratio between the parent society and the chapters. (It is now 75% to the state society and 25% to the chapters). After discussion the board decided to drop the proposal, since dues should be raised in relation to increasing expenses or increasing programs and activities; both of which are relatively stable at this time. Steve agreed to review the bylaws concerning the ratio of dues between the parent society and the chapters to see if there is flexibility in the split.

Officers: Steve Rust agreed to remain the treasurer for another year. Leonard Lake agreed to remain the secretary for another year.

There was a discussion whether the following bylaw change, which staggers the election of officers and increases the term to two years, was approved by the membership during the last election:

Section 5. Term of Office

1. The officers shall be elected to a two-year term. The elections of officers shall be staggered so that two of the four officers are scheduled for election each year. Elections for president and treasurer shall be conducted in the same year, while elections for vice president and secretary would be in the following year.

Steve Rust agreed to review last year’s election results.

Karl Holte volunteered for the office of president. Steve moved and Kristen seconded that the board appoint Karl to finish the term of president that is currently vacant. The motion carried with one member abstaining.

The meeting adjourned at 7:30 PM.

 

INPS Membership

IDAHO

Athol

Mark Mousseaux

 

Bayview

Ellen Franz

 

Belleview

Tom & Anne McAuliffe

 

Boise

Kay Beall

Holly H. Beck

Bobbie Billings

Bert Bowler

Cate Brigden & Steve Rust

Alan Byrne & Tamara Tanaka

Marcia Cogswell

Nancy Cole

Cyndi Leavitt Coulter

Jerry Cross

Christopher Davidson

Kelley Davis

Ann DeBolt & Roger Rosentreter

Phil Delphey

Dale Donahue

Dorothy Douglas & Walter Buechler

Jeff Fereday & Kay Hummel

Dwight Ferguson

Robert Fitzsimmons

Amanda Gailbreath

Wilma Gluch

Walter Hankins

Anne Herndon

Jody & Jim Hull

Jill Jasper

Mabel & Robin Jones

Glenda King

Lynda Leppert

Dick Lingenfelter

Dwight Magnuson

Michael Mancuso

Angelia Martin

Mary Grunewald McGown

Agnes Miller

Maria Minicucci

Bob Moseley & Susan Bernatas

Chris Murphy

Lenora Oosterhuis

Dan Ray & Valerie Geertson

Rick Raymondi

Edna Rey-Visgirdas

Mark Rohrbach

Jeannette Ross von Alten

Paul Shaffer

Darcy D. Sharp

Mark Shumar

Monique Slipher

James Smith

Jay & Lynda Smithman

Dick & Joey Stillinger

Michael & Margie Twitchell

Donald N. Wells

 

Bonner’s Ferry

Sally Grant

Margaret Mouat

Luise Peyton

 

Caldwell

Patricia Herbel

 

Careywood

Vicki Marron

Janet E. Benoit

 

Chubbuck

Carlene McDougal

 

Clark Fork

Konrad Dahlstrom & Joyce Pence

 

Cocolalla

Pat Brown

Phyllis & Walter Mott

 

Coeur d’Alene

Edward & Kristine Buchler

LeAnn Eno

Ralph & Peggy Faust

Rebecca Brown Thompson

 

Cottonwood

Mark Lowry

 

Council

Mering Hurd

Butch & Becky Snorgrass

Terry Tolbert

 

Deary

Merrill & Mary Conitz

Janice Hill

 

Driggs

Jeff Klausmann

Mike & Linda Merigliano

Penny Vasquez

 

 

Eagle

Robert Steele

Michael J. Wissenbach

 

Emmett

David Potter

 

Grangeville

Pat & Dave Green

Leonard & Marian Lake

 

Hagerman

Hagerman Fossil Beds Nat. Monu.

 

Hailey

Kim Hofelt

Lisa Horton

Diana Landis

Jo Ann Robbins

 

Hayden

Carolyn Cozzetto

Phil Hruskocy

 

Hayden Lake

Diane Christ

 

Hope

Dianna Copeland

Beverly Hall

Dorothy Modafferi

Mary Shackelford

 

Idaho Falls

Nancy Hampton

Gerald Jayne

Rose Lehman

Jerry & Robyn McCarthy

Kim Ragotzkie

Brian Schuetz

 

Indian Valley

Nancy Armitage

 

Inkom

Kathleen Lehman

Louise & Robert Shaw

 

Jerome

Lorna Irwin

 

Kamiah

Mrs. Lillian Pethtel

 

Kendrick

Dick & Roberta Bingham

Ken & Marjorie Wilken

 

Ketchum

Doreen Dorwood

Betsy Pomeroy

JoAnne Vassar

Wood River Land Trust

 

Kooskia

John Warofka

 

Lewiston

Kathy Elliot

Alfred LaPlante

Sandra Robins

Angela Sondenaa

 

Lowman

Penny Myers

 

McCall

Jim Crawford & Margo Conitz

Alma Hanson

Marilyn Olson

 

McCammon

Prof. Thomas R. Cox

 

Moscow

James & Judith Austin

Roger Blanchard

Ray & Erma Boyd

Elizabeth Brackney

Steve & Pam Brunsfeld

Paul & Annette Brusven

Janet Campbell

Lynn Cantrell

Mary Fauci

Dennis & Connie Ferguson

Judy Ferguson

Lauren Fins

Malcolm Furniss

Archie & Mary George

Laura Gephart & Peter Chilson

Liz Hall

Jeanie Harvey & Earl Druker

Mike & Janet Hays

Trish Heekin

Pat Hine & Jim Reece

Ray & Bettie Hoff

Fred & Jinny Johnson

Bob & Arlene Jonas

Loring & Veralee Jones

Greg & Megan Klemsrud

Ned Klopfenstein

Karen & Karl Launchbaugh

Sonja Lewis & Chuck Wellner

John & Elizabeth Marshall

Charlott Matinkus & Bruce Taylor

Paul McDaniel & Juanita Lichthardt

Larry McLaud

Frank Merickel

Nick Natale

Alan Poplawsky

Janet Silbernagel

Robert & Rosemary Skiles

Marge & Al Stage

Ellen Thiem

Jonalea Tonn

Katie Wilde

 

Nampa

Nancy Shaw

 

Naples

Helen H. Julian

 

Oakley

Miriam Louise Austin

 

Ola

Fred & Melly Zeillemaker

 

Peck

Sarah & Dick Walker

 

Pocatello

Jay & Phyllis Anderson

Joan Bergstrom

Audene Campbell

Drew Ceperly & Amy Morris

Jayne Chipman

Cleve Davis

Kristin Fletcher

Harry & Susan Giesbrecht

William Haight

Glenn Harvey

Geoff Hogander

Karl Holte

Deborah Jeppson

Jeff McCreary

Ruth Moorhead

Mel & Barbara Nicholls

Naida Olson

Priscilla Reis

David & Christy Smith

 

Ponderay

Nicole French

Pama Pierson

Pat Ramsey

Shirley Thornton

 

 

Post Falls

Laura & Bill Asbell

John Riley & Viki Leuba

 

Potlatch

Betty Southwick

 

Priest River

Betty Watts

 

Princeton

Gerry Queener

 

Rathdrum

Cynthia Langlitz

Vicki Peterson

 

Ririe

Shari Sellars

 

Sagle

Weslie & Joan Andres

Sylvia Chatburn

Fields W. Cobb, Jr.

Betsy Hammet

Charlotte Kerr

Nancy Low

Sherry Metz

Delano Pierce

Jeff Rich

Annette & James Runnalls

Patricia Stevens

Pat Van Volkenberg

 

Sandpoint

John & Valerie Albi

Gretchen Albrecht-Hellar

Eileen Atkisson & Lawrence Blakey

David & Marjorie Butts

Janice & Jack De Baun

Verna Mae Davis

Jim & Barbara Ann Ford

Phil & Michael Franklin

Marilyn George & Arlis Harvey

Margie Gibson

Hazel Hall

Shirley Hardy

Harold Hartmann & Dalles Hilton

Mollee Hecht

Isabel Hollriegel

Shelley & Scott Johnson

Sue Kohut

Harold & Marilou Laws

Terri Maurice

Elizabeth Merrill

Steve Mullen & Carol Holmes

Cherie Murphy

Dian Nelson

Valle Novak

Betty Padgett

Barbara Pressler

Nancy Renk

Nancy & Jack Rose

Suzanne Sawyer

Patrick Tormey

Robert & Gretchen Ward

Donald Welter

Joseph & Lois Wythe

 

Shoshone

Fred & Carol Blackburn

 

Sun Valley

Bill & Jeanne Cassell

Christine Gertschen

Florence Mackie

 

Twin Falls

Barbara Gentry

 

Viola

Kappy Brun

Reid & Nancy Miller

Pat & James Peek

 

Weiser

Betty Derig

Margaret Fuller

 

CALIFORNIA

 

 

Berkeley

Barbara Ertter

 

Cloverdale

Jack & Betty Guggolz

 

Del Mar

Ross & Leslie Hall

 

San Francisco

Strybing Arbor Society

 

S. Pasadena

Harry Spilman

 

COLORADO

 

 

Denver

Dorothy & Ottis Rechard

 

GEORGIA

 

 

Douglasville

Wayne Owen

 

MAINE

Franklin

Anne & Bob Minnicucci

 

Yarmouth

Michael Thompson

 

MICHIGAN

Lansing

Patrick F. Fields

 

MISSOURI

St. Louis

Missouri Botanical Gardens Library

 

MONTANA

Missoula

Angela Evenden

Scott Mincemoyer

Peter F. Stickney

 

Noxon

Jill Davies

 

Whitefish

Karen Gray & Jay Shepherd

 

NEVADA

Ely

Alexia Cochrane

 

NEW YORK

 

Bronx

Noel & Patricia Holmgren

 

OREGON

Baker City

Clair Button

 

Columbia City

Christine & Yaghoub Ebrahimi

 

Corvallis

Kenton Chambers

 

Eugene

Rhoda & Glen Love

 

La Grande

Barbara E. Russell

 

Ontario

Jean Findley

 

Pendleton

Bruce Barnes

 

Roseburg

Jim Thompson

 

TENNESSEE

Greenback

Edward Clebsch

 

UTAH

 

Logan

Kim Pierson

 

Ogden

Teresa Prendusi

 

VIRGINIA

 

Arlington

Larry E. Morse

 

WASHINGTON

 

Albion

Sue & Steve Morrison

 

Asotin

Gayle Williams

 

Clarkston

Don Brigham

 

Colbert

Brian Miller

 

Colville

Heather Swartz

 

LaCrosse

Connie Horton

 

Palouse

Doug Flansberg

Douglas & Patricia Flansberg

Charlotte Omoto

Jim & Jan Roberts

 

Pullman

Karen Adams

Peggy Chevalier

Greg & Leann Douhan

Karen Hansen

Elizabeth Schwartz

Tom & Diane Weber

Bertie Weddell

James & Eileen Whipple

 

Richland

Inez Austin

Karen Hinman

 

Spokane

Richard & Judith Gammon

David Noble

 

WYOMING

 

Laramie

Walter Fertig

Joy Handley

 

Rock Springs

James M. Glennon

 

Yellowstone National Park

Jennifer Whipple

Mark Mousseaux

 

Bayview

Ellen Franz

 

Belleview

Tom & Anne McAuliffe

 

Boise

Kay Beall

Holly H. Beck

Bobbie Billings

Bert Bowler

Cate Brigden & Steve Rust

Alan Byrne & Tamara Tanaka

Marcia Cogswell

Nancy Cole

Cyndi Leavitt Coulter

Jerry Cross

Christopher Davidson

Kelley Davis

Ann DeBolt & Roger Rosentreter

Phil Delphey

Dale Donahue

Dorothy Douglas & Walter Buechler

Jeff Fereday & Kay Hummel

Dwight Ferguson

Robert Fitzsimmons

Amanda Gailbreath

Wilma Gluch

Walter Hankins

Anne Herndon

Jody & Jim Hull

Jill Jasper

Mabel & Robin Jones

Glenda King

Lynda Leppert

Dick Lingenfelter

Dwight Magnuson

Michael Mancuso

Angelia Martin

Mary Grunewald McGown

Agnes Miller

Maria Minicucci

Bob Moseley & Susan Bernatas

Chris Murphy

Lenora Oosterhuis

Dan Ray & Valerie Geertson

Rick Raymondi

Edna Rey-Visgirdas

Mark Rohrbach

Jeannette Ross von Alten

Paul Shaffer

Darcy D. Sharp

Mark Shumar

Monique Slipher

James Smith

Jay & Lynda Smithman

Dick & Joey Stillinger

Michael & Margie Twitchell

Donald N. Wells

 

Bonner’s Ferry

Sally Grant

Margaret Mouat

Luise Peyton

 

Caldwell

Patricia Herbel

 

Careywood

Vicki Marron

Janet E. Benoit

 

Chubbuck

Carlene McDougal

 

Clark Fork

Konrad Dahlstrom & Joyce Pence

 

Cocolalla

Pat Brown

Phyllis & Walter Mott

 

Coeur d’Alene

Edward & Kristine Buchler

LeAnn Eno

Ralph & Peggy Faust

Rebecca Brown Thompson

 

Cottonwood

Mark Lowry

 

Council

Mering Hurd

Butch & Becky Snorgrass

Terry Tolbert

 

Deary

Merrill & Mary Conitz

Janice Hill

 

Driggs

Jeff Klausmann

Mike & Linda Merigliano

Penny Vasquez

 

 

Eagle

Robert Steele

Michael J. Wissenbach

 

Emmett

David Potter

 

Grangeville

Pat & Dave Green

Leonard & Marian Lake

 

Hagerman

Hagerman Fossil Beds Nat. Monu.

 

Hailey

Kim Hofelt

Lisa Horton

Diana Landis

Jo Ann Robbins

 

Hayden

Carolyn Cozzetto

Phil Hruskocy

 

Hayden Lake

Diane Christ

 

Hope

Dianna Copeland

Beverly Hall

Dorothy Modafferi

Mary Shackelford

 

Idaho Falls

Nancy Hampton

Gerald Jayne

Rose Lehman

Jerry & Robyn McCarthy

Kim Ragotzkie

Brian Schuetz

 

Indian Valley

Nancy Armitage

 

Inkom

Kathleen Lehman

Louise & Robert Shaw

 

Jerome

Lorna Irwin

 

Kamiah

Mrs. Lillian Pethtel

 

Kendrick

Dick & Roberta Bingham

Ken & Marjorie Wilken

 

Ketchum

Doreen Dorwood

Betsy Pomeroy

JoAnne Vassar

Wood River Land Trust

 

Kooskia

John Warofka

 

Lewiston

Kathy Elliot

Alfred LaPlante

Sandra Robins

Angela Sondenaa

 

Lowman

Penny Myers

 

McCall

Jim Crawford & Margo Conitz

Alma Hanson

Marilyn Olson

 

McCammon

Prof. Thomas R. Cox

 

Moscow

James & Judith Austin

Roger Blanchard

Ray & Erma Boyd

Elizabeth Brackney

Steve & Pam Brunsfeld

Paul & Annette Brusven

Janet Campbell

Lynn Cantrell

Mary Fauci

Dennis & Connie Ferguson

Judy Ferguson

Lauren Fins

Malcolm Furniss

Archie & Mary George

Laura Gephart & Peter Chilson

Liz Hall

Jeanie Harvey & Earl Druker

Mike & Janet Hays

Trish Heekin

Pat Hine & Jim Reece

Ray & Bettie Hoff

Fred & Jinny Johnson

Bob & Arlene Jonas

Loring & Veralee Jones

Greg & Megan Klemsrud

Ned Klopfenstein

Karen & Karl Launchbaugh

Sonja Lewis & Chuck Wellner

John & Elizabeth Marshall

Charlott Matinkus & Bruce Taylor

Paul McDaniel & Juanita Lichthardt

Larry McLaud

Frank Merickel

Nick Natale

Alan Poplawsky

Janet Silbernagel

Robert & Rosemary Skiles

Marge & Al Stage

Ellen Thiem

Jonalea Tonn

Katie Wilde

 

Nampa

Nancy Shaw

 

Naples

Helen H. Julian

 

Oakley

Miriam Louise Austin

 

Ola

Fred & Melly Zeillemaker

 

Peck

Sarah & Dick Walker

 

Pocatello

Jay & Phyllis Anderson

Joan Bergstrom

Audene Campbell

Drew Ceperly & Amy Morris

Jayne Chipman

Cleve Davis

Kristin Fletcher

Harry & Susan Giesbrecht

William Haight

Glenn Harvey

Geoff Hogander

Karl Holte

Deborah Jeppson

Jeff McCreary

Ruth Moorhead

Mel & Barbara Nicholls

Naida Olson

Priscilla Reis

David & Christy Smith

 

Ponderay

Nicole French

Pama Pierson

Pat Ramsey

Shirley Thornton

 

 

Post Falls

Laura & Bill Asbell

John Riley & Viki Leuba

 

Potlatch

Betty Southwick

 

Priest River

Betty Watts

 

Princeton

Gerry Queener

 

Rathdrum

Cynthia Langlitz

Vicki Peterson

 

Ririe

Shari Sellars

 

Sagle

Weslie & Joan Andres

Sylvia Chatburn

Fields W. Cobb, Jr.

Betsy Hammet

Charlotte Kerr

Nancy Low

Sherry Metz

Delano Pierce

Jeff Rich

Annette & James Runnalls

Patricia Stevens

Pat Van Volkenberg

 

Sandpoint

John & Valerie Albi

Gretchen Albrecht-Hellar

Eileen Atkisson & Lawrence Blakey

David & Marjorie Butts

Janice & Jack De Baun

Verna Mae Davis

Jim & Barbara Ann Ford

Phil & Michael Franklin

Marilyn George & Arlis Harvey

Margie Gibson

Hazel Hall

Shirley Hardy

Harold Hartmann & Dalles Hilton

Mollee Hecht

Isabel Hollriegel

Shelley & Scott Johnson

Sue Kohut

Harold & Marilou Laws

Terri Maurice

Elizabeth Merrill

Steve Mullen & Carol Holmes

Cherie Murphy

Dian Nelson

Valle Novak

Betty Padgett

Barbara Pressler

Nancy Renk

Nancy & Jack Rose

Suzanne Sawyer

Patrick Tormey

Robert & Gretchen Ward

Donald Welter

Joseph & Lois Wythe

 

Shoshone

Fred & Carol Blackburn

 

Sun Valley

Bill & Jeanne Cassell

Christine Gertschen

Florence Mackie

 

Twin Falls

Barbara Gentry

 

Viola

Kappy Brun

Reid & Nancy Miller

Pat & James Peek

 

Weiser

Betty Derig

Margaret Fuller

 

CALIFORNIA

 

 

Berkeley

Barbara Ertter

 

Cloverdale

Jack & Betty Guggolz

 

Del Mar

Ross & Leslie Hall

 

San Francisco

Strybing Arbor Society

 

S. Pasadena

Harry Spilman

 

COLORADO

 

 

Denver

Dorothy & Ottis Rechard

 

GEORGIA

 

 

Douglasville

Wayne Owen

 

MAINE

Franklin

Anne & Bob Minnicucci

 

Yarmouth

Michael Thompson

 

MICHIGAN

Lansing

Patrick F. Fields

 

MISSOURI

St. Louis

Missouri Botanical Gardens Library

 

MONTANA

Missoula

Angela Evenden

Scott Mincemoyer

Peter F. Stickney

 

Noxon

Jill Davies

 

Whitefish

Karen Gray & Jay Shepherd

 

NEVADA

Ely

Alexia Cochrane

 

NEW YORK

 

Bronx

Noel & Patricia Holmgren

 

OREGON

Baker City

Clair Button

 

Columbia City

Christine & Yaghoub Ebrahimi

 

Corvallis

Kenton Chambers

 

Eugene

Rhoda & Glen Love

 

La Grande

Barbara E. Russell

 

Ontario

Jean Findley

 

Pendleton

Bruce Barnes

 

Roseburg

Jim Thompson

 

TENNESSEE

Greenback

Edward Clebsch

 

UTAH

 

Logan

Kim Pierson

 

Ogden

Teresa Prendusi

 

VIRGINIA

 

Arlington

Larry E. Morse

 

WASHINGTON

 

Albion

Sue & Steve Morrison

 

Asotin

Gayle Williams

 

Clarkston

Don Brigham

 

Colbert

Brian Miller

 

Colville

Heather Swartz

 

LaCrosse

Connie Horton

 

Palouse

Doug Flansberg

Douglas & Patricia Flansberg

Charlotte Omoto

Jim & Jan Roberts

 

Pullman

Karen Adams

Peggy Chevalier

Greg & Leann Douhan

Karen Hansen

Elizabeth Schwartz

Tom & Diane Weber

Bertie Weddell

James & Eileen Whipple

 

Richland

Inez Austin

Karen Hinman

 

Spokane

Richard & Judith Gammon

David Noble

 

WYOMING

 

Laramie

Walter Fertig

Joy Handley

 

Rock Springs

James M. Glennon

 

Yellowstone National Park

Jennifer Whipple

 

v Please forward corrections or additions to Steve Rust, INPS Treasurer, 1201 N. 24th Street, Boise, ID 83702 v

 

 

 

 

Chapter News

Calypso Chapter

Calypso’s first meeting of the year will be March 1 to hear Tim Gerlitz of the Mycological Society speak on morel mushrooms, and to line up wildflower walks at Tubbs Hill and Q’Emelin Park, an activity for Arbor Day, and an August trip to Roman Nose. A Huff Lake trip is set for July 8.

At the fall meeting, Secretary Phil Hruskocy, Treasurer Janet Benoit, and Newsletter Editor Peggy Faust agreed to serve for another year. The chapter’s "herbarium trunk," made with help from LeAnn Eno, Mark Mousseaux, and the Forest Service, is available for members to use for education programs. Peggy Faust presented the book she and her husband Ralph published, "Wildflowers of the Inland Northwest," and described how since moving to Idaho 20 years ago, they had applied their photography hobby to north Idaho’s flora, taken botany classes at North Idaho College, and published their collection through the Museum of North Idaho. The book sells for $15.95 and is available from the museum or from local bookstores.

The chapter newsletter, Calypso Companion, includes a notice from The Nature Conservancy (TNC). TNC is soliciting naturalists to teach classes in birding, botany, herpetology, and forest and wetland ecology, at the Conservancy’s North Idaho preserves (Cougar Bay near Coeur d’Alene, Gamlin Lake near Sagle, Perkins Lake near Moyie Springs, and Moscow Mountain and Idler’s Rest near Moscow). Instructors will be paid $50 for each class taught. The classes are being offered as part of the Conservancy’s North Idaho "Outdoor Exploration Program" to teach the next generation about the importance of our environment and its protection. Instructors are needed for science classes in the local schools, restoration projects with students from Anchor House (the local chapter of Idaho Youth Ranch), guided outdoor nature classes, and setting up interpretive signs and an outdoor classroom at Cougar Bay. For information contact The Nature Conservancy, 424 Sherman Ave., Suite 204, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814, (208) 676-8176.

A proposed Forest Service interpretive project at Huff Lake, near Nordman, is attracting interest from members of Calypso Chapter as well as from the nearby Northeast Chapter of the Washington Native Plant Society and the Selkirk-Priest Basin Association. The seven-acre fen supports rare boreal species. There are plans to construct a floating dock for viewing the fen and a kiosk for interpretive signing as part of an effort to reduce trampling impacts to the peat mats. Member Dave Noble is doing a lot of the ground work for this project. For more information contact Priest Lake Ranger District biologist Tim Layser, (208) 443-6838, or botanist Diane Penny (208) 443-6847 or <dpenny/r1_ipnf@ fs.fed.us>. Dave Noble can be reached at (509) 534-5558 or <dnoble@tincan.tincan.org>.

 

Kinnikinnick Chapter

New officers were elected at the November 1999 meeting: Valle Novak, president; John Albi, vice president; Sylvia M. Chatburn, secretary; and Patricia Stevens, treasurer. Michael and Phil Franklin continue as newsletter editors; Lois Wythe remains as arboretum coordinator; Pat Ramsey stays as membership coordinator, as do Pama Pearson as field trips coordinator, Gretchen Albrecht-Hellar as special events coordinator, and Isabel Hollriegel as hospitality coordinator.

A January meeting featured Dr. John Anderson’s talk on The Kalispel People: The First to Discover and Utilize the Native Plants of North Idaho. He spoke about the native people of the Sandpoint area and the economic value of the blue camas (Camassia quamash) that once thrived in the moist meadowlands of eastern Washington, Idaho, and western Montana. The Kalispel lived in what is now Bonner County until 1887, when they were dispersed by the Sandpoint Treaty to reservations in Washington and Montana. The speaker read from his book "Nestelah’s Journey" about a young Kalispel woman known as Blue Flower, whose actions cause blue camas to disappear from a portion of the valley occupied by her people. Dr. Anderson told the group about the small Kalispel reservation near Usk, Washington (on the Pend Oreille River northwest of Sandpoint), where visitors are invited to attend the annual powwow.

In February members were treated to a video about the life of Juliette de Bairacli Levy, a remarkable woman who has studied herbal medicine with nomadic peoples around the world.

The chapter would like to attract more members to the Arboretum Committee. Please contact Lois Wythe at (208) 263-8038 if you would like to help on this exciting project.

 

Pahove Chapter

Monthly meetings are planned for the third Thursdays of March, April, and May. A reminder with details concerning the times and locations of the meetings will be mailed to chapter members.

Upcoming events:

•In March, Chris Murphy will discuss the vegetation of 45 Ranch located in the southwest corner of the Owyhee Plateau.

•In April, Roger Rosentreter will show slides of rare and common mosses and lichens.

•In May, Michael Mancuso will discuss the flora of the Owyhee Front.

 

Sah-Wah-Be Chapter

The Sah-Wah-Be Chapter is quietly awaiting April, when we expect to meet for elections and trip-planning. E-mail Ruth (moorruth@isu.edu) with your suggestions for which eating establishment to try THIS year!

 

White Pine Chapter

Our chapter remains very active. We live in an area of diverse habitats that sustain a huge number of plant species. We are also fortunate to live near two universities where new knowledge about plants is generated. The officers will meet this winter to consider some special projects for our chapter. Some ideas are developing a web site, finding additional ways to circulate meeting announcements to reach a broader audience, and renewing our commitment to establishing native plants at the University of Idaho arboretum.

At a January meeting Dr. Linda Cook, Director of the University of Idaho Herbarium, gave a talk on "The Tragopogon Triangle-A Palouse Polyploid Complex." Usually considered a weed, this complex of five species has provided exciting insights into the ways and means of evolution in plants. One of the first and best examples of speciation (the process by which new species are formed) through hybridization occurs right here on the Palouse.

A January field trip to Rose Creek Preserve, led by Bertie Weddell, got us out of the winter doldrums and ready for spring activities. Rose Creek Preserve contains both native riparian and native bunchgrass communities.

In February, Dr. Linda Wilson, a research support scientist at the University of Idaho, presented "Holistic Management of Invasive Plant Species." She has researched non-native hawkweed, spotted knapweed, yellow star-thistle, leafy spurge, and St. John’s wort since the early 90s.

Upcoming events:

•March 23: Plant Diversity in the South West Australia Botanical Province—slide show by Nancy Miller at 7:30 PM at University of Idaho’s College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range Sciences, Room 213. Contact Sonja Lewis at (208) 882-3544.

•April 20: DNA, a Short and Simple Overview, by Dr. Steve Brunsfeld of the University of Idaho at 7:30 PM at UI’s College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range Sciences, Room 213. Contact Sonja Lewis at (208) 882-3544.

 

Wood River Chapter

Wood River Chapter is still accepting members. No activities are planned at this time. If anyone wants info on joining and local activities they can contact: Jo Ann Robbins at (208) 788-5585.

 

 

 

News and Notes

 

 

Are beetles inordinately fond of flowering plants? When asked what he had learned about the Creator from studying evolution, the British biologist J. B. S. Haldane replied that He must have had "an inordinate fondness for beetles." This famous quip reflects the remarkable diversity of the Order Coleoptera. With over 300,000 species, beetles have more species than any other known group of plants or animals. Recent studies by Brian Farrell at Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology shed light on the connection between beetle diversity and the evolution of flowering plants. The ancestors of herbivorous beetles existed about 230 millions years ago, but these early beetle lineages, which fed on conifers and cycads, were not particularly diverse. The extraordinary diversity of beetles did not come about until after flowering plants appeared. The fact that beetles and flowering plants diversified at about the same time suggests that beetle diversity depends upon the diversity of flowering plants, but until recently evidence to support this hypothesis was lacking. To resolve this question, Farrell used data from paleontology, biogeography, genetics, and natural history to reconstruct the evolutionary history of plant-eating beetles. He produced DNA sequences from 115 species, representing all beetle subfamilies, and combined this information with data on 212 morphological characters. The resulting family trees show that beetles colonized angiosperms several times, and each time they experienced an adaptive radiation in which they evolved into many new and varied forms, such as leaf miners, leaf chewers, seed eaters, and root feeders. The newly evolved angiosperms were like unoccupied islands. When herbivorous beetles colonized each new "island," they diversified in bursts of speciation (like Darwin’s famous finches on the Galapagos Islands). Each time an angiosperm-feeding group of beetles arose, it evolved into a host of new forms. Farrell’s work supports the contention that the reason there are so many beetles is because the evolution of flowering plants provided them with resources that they were able to exploit in myriad ways. His intriguing analysis leaves one wondering if perhaps it was really beetles’ inordinate fondness for flowering plants that led to their great diversity.

 

Maybe it should be called "Miraculis" macfarlanei. At this year’s Rare Plant Conference, ecologist Mark Lowry of the BLM Cottonwood Field Office updated us on rescue efforts for a population of Macfarlane’s four o’clock (Mirabilis macfarlanei; the first plant in Idaho to be listed under the Endangered Species Act) that had been in a large landslide and associated access road construction on private land along Highway 95 between Riggins and White Bird (milepost 210.5). With help from Roger Rosentreter and others, diggers risked the steep, unstable slide area to uncover 426 plants for transplanting—and survived new slides that came down while they were working. Arrangements had been made with the landowner, but confusion occurred, and an unexpected visit from Idaho County deputies was further complicated by Roger’s mischievous display of a damp burlap sack of hefty yam-sized roots accompanied by the comment, "I’ve got the goods." Next came the arduous task of digging large holes to plant the rescued roots at the nearby Lucile Caves Research Natural Area. All were safely planted and watered, and their future seemed bright until a July 2 fireworks fire burned over a fourth of the new transplants, killing aboveground stems. Hopefully, mortality will be light, since the plants had started to die back for the year. We’re keeping our fingers crossed. Mark added that the population that was accidentally sprayed in 1997 (see Sage Notes Summer 1998, 20(3):17) is showing 80% survival. There are six populations of this threatened species along the Salmon River, and Mark, Brian Maier, and Wendy Velman collected over 5 lbs of seeds for the Berry Botanic Garden seed bank in Portland (see Sage Notes Spring 1999 21(2):12).

 

New Native Plants Journal produced in Idaho. The first issue of Native Plants Journal came out in January. This cooperative project between the University of Idaho Research Nursery and the USDA Forest Service provides a forum for dispersing practical information about the planting and growing of North American native plants for conservation, restoration, reforestation, landscaping, and highway corridors. The journal includes papers that are useful to, and understandable by, growers and planters of native plants and that contribute significantly to scientific literature. Check the web site <www.uidaho.edu/nativeplants> for current titles and abstracts of papers. The journal will be published twice a year, and a one-year subscription is $30. Complimentary issues, while supplies last, are available from Kas Dumroese, Editor, Native Plants Journal, Forest Research Nursery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1137 or at the website.

 

Excellent new rare plant guide on the web. Check out the "Montana Rare Plant Field Guide" on the Montana Natural Heritage homepage at <http://orion2.nris.state.mt.us/mtnhp/plants/>. There are photos and line drawings, habitat descriptions, status lists, dot maps, and references for over 300 species. Information is updated quarterly. Also linked to this site is the newsletter of the Montana Natural Heritage Program, Optimolocus.

 

New book on range and biodiversity. The University of Oklahoma Press has published a new book, "The Western Range Revisited: Removing Livestock from Public Lands to Conserve Native Biodiversity," by University of Wyoming College of Law Professor Debra Donahue. Professor Donahue proposes a landscape-level strategy for conserving native biological diversity on federal rangelands, a strategy based chiefly on removing livestock from large tracts of arid BLM lands in 10 western states. Pahove member Roger Rosentreter is mentioned. Copies may be ordered from OU Press at (800) 627-7377 and <www.ou.edu/oupress>.

 

Lichen soup. Bryology Professor Janice Glime reports from Michigan Technological University: One of my students told me his aunt has a recipe for rock tripe (Umbilicaria) soup. His story is that the Ojibway Indians used it as an emergency food in this area, and when the missionary Father Marquette needed food in the winter the Native Americans showed him this to use as food. My student has tried it as a soup with some cut up onions and a little salt and butter (on hand for an unsuccessful fishing trip) and claims it is quite good, having a mushroom taste. Maybe George Washington really did feed it to his troops at Valley Forge.

 

Lewis and Clark plants in Clarkston. The Port of Clarkston, WA, right across the river from Lewiston, ID, is planning to feature plants collected by the famous explorers. When the Corps of Discovery camped at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater Rivers in 1805, they described the area as "open plains, no timber of any kind, a few hackberry bushes and willows excepted." The seven-acre park will be planted with many of the species reported by Lewis and Clark, with special emphasis on the Snake-Clearwater region.

 

Fire on the Mountain. The Bureau of Land Management is requesting public input on their proposed use of prescribed fire to reduce natural fuels concentrations in the Craig Mountain Cooperative Management Area south of Lewiston, ID. Comments are due by 31 March 2000. For a copy of the complete "Request for Public Input" notice, contact BLM, Cottonwood Field Office, Route 3, Box 181, Cottonwood, ID 83522, (208) 962-3245. Questions/concerns? Contact Janice Hill (janice@turbonet.com).